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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Coastal vulnerability to sea-level rise found in the catalog.

Coastal vulnerability to sea-level rise

Erika S Hammar-Klose

Coastal vulnerability to sea-level rise

A preliminary database for the U.S. Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf of Mexico coasts (U.S. Geological Survey digital data series)

by Erika S Hammar-Klose

  • 52 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by For sale by Books and Open-File Reports Section] .
Written in English


The Physical Object
FormatUnknown Binding
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL10949015M
ISBN 100607965150
ISBN 109780607965155

  A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Padre Island National Seashore in Texas. The CVI ranks the following in terms of their physical contribution to sea-level rise-related coastal change: geomorphology, regional coastal slope, rate of relative sea-level rise Author: Elizabeth A. Pendleton. as having an overall low vulnerability to the impacts of sea-level rise. Even so, about 30% of its coastal wetlands could be lost given a 1-m sea-level-rise scenario. People’s valuation and awareness of the coastal environment in Ireland has been limited for much of the 20th century by factors of history and emigration. Many coastal areas have.

Areas Vulnerable to Sea Level Rise in San Francisco Bay. Sea level rise is a concern for many Bay Area residents, community leaders, and resource managers. BCDC is taking multiple steps to address the threat of rising sea level and provide the latest data and tools to better understand sea level rise vulnerability around the Bay. C onsequences of sea level rise on coastal resources are often evaluated using vulnerability assessments. Local, regional, and statewide vulnerabilities can be addressed using adaptation strategies. Click on the sections below to learn more about these different steps useful for sea level rise adaptation planning and how they can be used in Local Coastal Programs and Coastal .

The Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) provides insight into the relative potential of coastal change due to future sea-level rise. The maps and data presented here can be viewed in at least two ways: 1) as an example of where physical changes are most likely to occur as sea-level rises; and 2) as a planning tool for Fire Island National Seashore. Coastal erosion. Sea level rise is increasing coastal erosion rates. Storm surge. Sea level rise can increase the height of storm surge. King tide flooding. Sea level rise is causing King Tides to happen more frequently, last longer and extend farther inland. Urban flooding. Urban flooding can be caused by short-duration, very heavy rain events.


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Coastal vulnerability to sea-level rise by Erika S Hammar-Klose Download PDF EPUB FB2

About Sea Level Rise Viewer v The purpose of this map viewer is to provide federal, state, and local coastal resource managers and planners with a preliminary look at sea level rise and coastal flooding impacts. The viewer is a screening-level tool that uses best-available, nationally consistent data sets and analyses.

The goal of this project is to quantify, at the National scale, the relative susceptibility of the Nation's coast to sea- level rise through the use of a coastal vulnerability index (CVI).

This initial classification is based upon the variables geomorphology, regional coastal slope, tide range, wave height, relative sea-level rise and shoreline erosion and accretion rates.

The original national coastal vulnerability index (CVI) assessment was motivated by expected accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and the uncertainty in the response of the coastline to SLR. This research was conducted between andand is currently being updated using new data sources and methodology.

Vulnerability of coastal people, the uncertain magnitude and pace of sea level rise, migration and resettlement as a possible response are the core ele- ments of what might be the biggest challenge for humanity in the 21st cen. Impacts of sea-level rise on the Moroccan coastal zone: Quantifying coastal erosion and flooding in the Tangier Bay Maria Snoussi, Tachfine Ouchani, Abdou Khouakhi, Isabelle Niang-Diop Pages Report on Coastal Vulnerability and Sea Level Rise 4 December 8, • Protect the watershed and strengthen stormwater management practices.

• Redevelop historic assets while maintaining neighborhood fabric. • Foster emergency readiness. • Revitalize downtown businesses. Global Climate Change, Sea Level Rise and Coastal Vulnerability.

Abstract. Sponsored by the Council on Disaster Risk Management. Sea Level Rise and Coastal Infrastructure: Prediction, Risks, and Solutions analyzes the challenges posed by rising sea levels and climate change. Scientists estimate that global sea levels could rise by as much as 20 feet in this century, directly affecting about million people worldwide.

National Assessment of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise: Preliminary Results for the U.S. Atlantic Coast Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) The coastal vulnerability index (CVI) presented here is similar to that used by Gornitz et al.

(), as well as to the sensitivity index employed by Shaw et al. The book provides an excellent overview of how fast sea level is rising, the vulnerability of coastal cities to sea level rise in both the U.S.

and worldwide, the failed government policies that. Driven by climate change, global mean sea level rose 11–16 cm in the twentieth century 1, with sharp, immediate cuts to carbon emissions, it could rise another m this century 3,4,5,6,7.

Coronado’s Sea Level Rise Vulnerability and Adaptation Plan was based on predicted rising of sea levels in the coastal city through The plan aims to inform the City Council, commission and citizens on land use and capital investment decisions made in response to predicted sea level rise.

The global rate of sea-level rise has doubled from millimeters per year over the 20th century to approximately millimeters per year in recent years. In many coastal areas, the rate of relative sea-level rise is much higher as a result of subsidence resulting from human causes, such as groundwater pumping and fossil fuel extraction.

future sea level rise due to human induced global warming is the main threat to the coastal zone. The global mean sea level is continuing to rise during the 21st century. In this regards, coastal vulnerability assessment due to sea level rise is needed.

Globally, there are many coastal vulnerability assessment tools. The main limitation, for making accurate assessment of the vulnerability of the coastal zone to sea-level rise was the lack of data on the topography of the coastal area to the desired accuracy (i.

corridor are not only currently at risk from flooding and coastal storms, but that sea level rise and climate change will significantly exacerbate these risks in the future. Findings include that at least 30 percent of the study area is already at risk from a Category 5 storm surge, with sea level rise projected to increase that risk even further.

For each sea-level rise scenario, coastal vulnerability maps, with a spatial resolution of 20 m, are produced at a national scale to identify areas more vulnerable to sea-level rise, which are key. Policies on hazard avoidance and coastal resource protection provide the basis for the Commission to consider the impacts of sea level rise.

The Commission has long considered sea level rise, erosion rates, and other effects of a dynamic climate in its analysis of permits and LCPs, staff recommendations, and Commission decisions. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection announced a $, grant Friday to study Sarasota County's vulnerability to sea level rise brought on by climate change.

About 40% of Florida's. New elevation data triple estimates of global vulnerability to sea-level rise and coastal flooding.

Nature Communications, OctoberDOI: /sz 6. Bangladesh is likely to be one of the most vulnerable countries in the world to climate change and sea level rise.

This paper discusses the changing pattern of climatic conditions (temperature and rainfall), reviewing sea level rise scenarios and its. Coastal Vulnerability Assessment of Dry Tortugas National Park (DRTO) to Sea-Level Rise: USGS Open-File Report [Elizabeth A.

Pendleton, United U.S. Department of the Interior, et al.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise .Sea level rise, a consequence of climate change, is one of the biggest challenges that countries and regions with coastal lowlands will face in the medium term.

This study proposes a methodology for assessing the vulnerability to sea-level rise on the Atlantic coast of mainland Portugal. Some scenarios of extreme sea levels for different return periods and extreme .The U.S.

National Assessment’s coastal sector assessment (Boesch et al., ) estimated the cumulative cost of an inch (centimeter) sea level rise by at between $20 and $ billion, and a 3-foot (roughly 1-meter) sea level rise produced roughly double this figure.